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Cancun Hotel Weather Live Update

Traveling to Cancun Mexico? Whether you live here or are coming on vacation, this page will let you know whether to stay in your hotel or hit the beach and go on a tour.

 

The webcam can be viewed between
5:00 AM and 7:20 PM

Above: Downtown Cancun web cam
(compliments of Entertainment-Plus.net)

 

The photos below are clickable and are updated every 10 mins

Cloud temperature

Cloud temperature

Satellite Image

Satellite Image

Computer Models

Weather Overview - from The Weather Channel

Average Temperatures

  Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Day (F) 81 82 84 85 88 89 90 90 89 87 84 82
Night (F) 67 68 71 73 77 78 78 77 76 74 72 69
Day (C) 27 28 29 29 31 32 32 32 32 31 29 28
Night (C) 19 20 22 23 25 26 26 25 24 23 22 21
 
Click the above images for more detailed info
(Image sources: Wunderground and National Hurricane Center)
 
 

Weather Tips! The sun is very strong in Cancun all year round. If you are outside of your hotel, wear sunscreen at all times. Even on a cloudy day you can get sunburned. When going inland you will note that the temperature is much higher.

The popular tour to Chichen Itza is a prime example.... wear light clothing and buy bottled water. A small towel from you hotel room can help, just put some of the water on it to cool you down.

 
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Hurricane Preparation in Cancun

From 1 June to end November it is hurricane season. Here's how to prepare.

 

Watch the 5 day tracking forecast : On this page of Cancun Assist are charts constantly updated of tropical storm and hurricane activities. If you see activity, click on the image and then look for the 5 day tracking forecast for the storm in question.

Hurricane Checklist

  • Car tank filled
  • Propane tank filled (and secured)
  • Cash
  • First aid supplies and prescription medications
  • BBQ briquettes
  • Candles and lighter/matches
  • Flashlights, battery-operated radio and a two-week supply of batteries
  • Several jugs of Electropura/Crystal water, electrolyte drinks and cooler with gel packs
  • Hammer, nails, masking tape, plywood and tarps for quick home repairs
  • Clean up supplies - pails, mops, brooms
  • Non-perishable food items (canned goods primarily) and a manual can opener
  • Protective clothing, rain gear, and sturdy shoes
  • Buy extra screen material

From personal experience

Preparation... you start to feel that you can conquer this sucker!... finding wood, 19 trips to Walmart for stuff you forgot, getting organized. By the time the hurricane arrives, you are exhausted. Your clients are screaming at you (because they are in Florida or New York and don't have a shmick about your approaching hurricane) and you are not concentrating on your telecommuting job.

Eventually, the power goes out and you are sitting with a flashlight, a ton of rain, no information, no phone, and stuff flying around outside.

After the hurricane it is usually calm... no wind, no a/c, no power and sweltering HOT. This is the worst part... now you are really exhausted and everything is a mess.

I thought I was smart.. I bought a 4KW generator (and all the neighbours tapped in). Felt good to have a fan running, the fridge making ice, and unbelievably - an Internet connection. Unfortunately the generator blew both of my computers (even when plugged into surge protectors.... arggg).

Fortunately there was no loss of life in Cancun during the recent Hurricane Emily in July 2005. It was a Category 4 and there was very little rain. The eye hit about 40 miles south of us. 5 days without power is nothing compared to what happened in New Orleans with Hurricane Katrina.

After seeing this season of 2005 I wonder why Cancun residents are never told to evacuate... it has been drilled into us to "ride it out." If another cat 3 or higher arrives... I WILL leave for Merida or Florida.

When the storm approaches

  • Purchase the recommended emergency supplies
  • Keep an address book/phone book on paper (your computer will have no power or Internet connection)
  • Monitor weather reports for updated information
  • Store enough drinking water to last several days
  • Bring your pets indoors
  • Clear your yard of any loose or unsecured objects
  • Tape or board windows to reduce the risk of broken glass
  • Get extra cash. ATMs may be out of order after a severe storm
  • Keep your car fueled and ready to go
  • Leave your home if asked to evacuate
  • Store valuables and personal papers in waterproof containers on the highest level of your home, or take them with you if evacuating.
  • Park your car on high ground and away from large trees or telephone poles
  • Charge your cell phone

During the Storm

  • Stay inside, away from windows, skylights and glass doors.
  • Keep supply of flashlights and extra batteries handy. Avoid open flames, such as candles and kerosene lamps, as a source of light.
  • If power is lost, turn off major appliances to reduce power "surge" when electricity is restored.
  • Listen constantly to a battery-operated radio or television for official instructions.
  • Prepare to move to higher ground nearby (a neighbor upstairs?) and plan a route
  • Turn off your cell phone to conserve battery power for when the network comes up again

After the Storm

  • Remember that you may not have immediate access to your home. Emergency rescue crews, power crews, and other personnel may be attending to special needs. Roads could be blocked, power lines could be down, and people may be trapped and in need of assistance.
  • Make sure that you have current identification. You may have to pass through identification check points before being allowed access to your home/neighborhood.
  • Avoid driving, as roads may be blocked. Avoid sight-seeing, or entering a storm ravaged area unnecessarily. You could be mistaken for a looter.
  • Avoid downed power lines, even if they look harmless. Avoid metal fences and other metal objects near downed lines.
  • Avoid turning the power on at your home if there is flooding present. Have a professional conduct a thorough inspection first.
  • Consider having professionals/licensed contractors inspect your home for damage and help in repairs. This includes electricians, as well as professionals to inspect gas lines, remove uprooted trees, and check plumbing. Remember that downed or damaged trees can contain power lines that can be a hazard.
  • Use a camera or camcorder to record thoroughly any damage done to your home, before any repairs are attempted.
  • In certain areas, the flooding rains that accompany a storm can create pest problems. Be aware of potential pest problems in your area, such as mice, rats, insects or snakes, that may have "come with the storm".
  • Telephone lines will likely be busy in the area; use a phone only for emergencies.
  • Flooding brings with it the risk of waterborne bacterial contaminations. Avoid standing water and wash with clean water and soap frequently.
 

Atlantic Storm and Hurricane Names

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
Arlene
Bret
Cindy
Dennis
Emily
Franklin
Gert
Harvey
Irene
Jose
Katrina
Lee
Maria
Nate
Ophelia
Philippe
Rita
Stan
Tammy
Vince
Wilma
Alberto
Beryl
Chris
Debby
Ernesto
Florence
Gordon
Helene
Isaac
Joyce
Kirk
Leslie
Michael
Nadine
Oscar
Patty
Rafael
Sandy
Tony
Valerie
William
Andrea
Barry
Chantal
Dean
Erin
Felix
Gabrielle
Humberto
Ingrid
Jerry
Karen
Lorenzo
Melissa
Noel
Olga
Pablo
Rebekah
Sebastien
Tanya
Van
Wendy
Arthur
Bertha
Cristobal
Dolly
Edouard
Fay
Gustav
Hanna
Ike
Josephine
Kyle
Laura
Marco
Nana
Omar
Paloma
Rene
Sally
Teddy
Vicky
Wilfred
Ana
Bill
Claudette
Danny
Erika
Fred
Grace
Henri
Ida
Joaquin
Kate
Larry
Mindy
Nicholas
Odette
Peter
Rose
Sam
Teresa
Victor
Wanda
Alex
Bonnie
Colin
Danielle
Earl
Fiona
Gaston
Hermine
Igor
Julia
Karl
Lisa
Matthew
Nicole
Otto
Paula
Richard
Shary
Tomas
Virginie
Walter

Experience shows that the use of short, distinctive given names in written as well as spoken communications is quicker and less subject to error than the older more cumbersome latitude-longitude identification methods. These advantages are especially important in exchanging detailed storm information between hundreds of widely scattered stations, coastal bases, and ships at sea.

Since 1953, Atlantic tropical storms have been named from lists originated by the National Hurricane Center and now maintained and updated by an international committee of the World Meteorological Organization. The lists featured only women's names until 1979, when men's and women's names were alternated. Six lists are used in rotation. Thus, the 2004 list will be used again in 2010. Here is more information on the history of naming hurricanes.

The only time that there is a change in the list is if a storm is so deadly or costly that the future use of its name on a different storm would be inappropriate for reasons of sensitivity. If that occurs, then at an annual meeting by the WMO committee (called primarily to discuss many other issues) the offending name is stricken from the list and another name is selected to replace it.

Several names have been changed since the lists were last used. Four names from the 1995 list have been retired. On the 2001 list, Lorenzo has replaced Luis, Michelle has replaced Marilyn, Olga has replaced Opal, and Rebekah has replaced Roxanne. Three names from the 1996 list have been retired. On the 2002 list, Cristobal has replaced Cesar, Fay has replaced Fran, and Hanna has replaced Hortense. Two names from the 1998 list have been retired. On the 2004 list, Gaston has replaced Georges and Matthew has replaced Mitch. On the 2006 list, Kirk has replaced Keith. Here is more information on the retirement of hurricane names.

In the event that more than 21 named tropical cyclones occur in the Atlantic basin in a season, additional storms will take names from the Greek alphabet: Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, and so on.

 
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